How to Remove Linoleum Flooring from Your Home

linoleum flooringWhether you’re embarking on a total foreclosure cleanout or just doing some renovation work, you’ve got to deal with that old linoleum flooring. The good news is, you don’t need any real DIY expertise, but you do need a bit of persistence and get-it-done attitude. You probably know this is hard work but you can do it on your own, just set aside the time and get a few helping hands to give you more to work with.

How to Remove Linoleum Flooring from Your Home

What you should know about linoleum floor removal is it’s much like popcorn ceiling removal — it requires a whole bunch of elbow grease. Linoleum is a great flooring choice because it’s low-cost and very durable. Plus, it comes in a wide variety of styles. So, it makes for the perfect solution for many spaces. But, it isn’t the end-all-be-all of flooring. Linoleum is susceptible to damage from sharp objects and even pet claws.
One of the most frustrating home remodeling tasks is trying to remove an old linoleum or vinyl floor. Even when the linoleum is pulled off, things only get worse. Now you’re faced with gobs of old glue that seem harder than meteorites all over the floor. —Improve Net.com
What’s more, linoleum (although very easy to clean and maintain) has another drawback: it doesn’t last as long as other floors. For instance, hardwood can last for several decades, scores, and even more than a century. Tile is also another very durable flooring. Linoleum does have a long lifespan but it does have an expiration date, so-to-speak. That means having to take it up and replace it. Here’s how to remove linoleum flooring from your home:
  1. Conduct an asbestos test to start. The first order of business is to test the linoleum for the presence of asbestos. This is particularly important if the flooring date backs to the 1970’s or even the 1980’s. It’s possible for the linoleum to contain some level of asbestos. If so, you’ll need to hire a pro service.
  2. Peel the linoleum from the subfloor. The most difficult part of removing linoleum flooring is to actually get it all up from the subfloor itself. That’s hard because this process can damage the subfloor. Begin in a corner to start and then use a floor scraper to get the material up.
  3. Take all the adhesive off the subfloor. Use a strong adhesive remover to absorb and/or dissolve the adhesive on the subfloor. Be sure to use a product that’s safe for your type of subfloor and follow the manufacturer’s instructions carefully for the best results.
  4. Make repairs and clean the subfloor to finish. To finish and ready the subfloor for a new covering, you’ll need to fill in any gauges, make all necessary repairs, and then clean it. If you skip this step, the new flooring won’t perform and it could cause a redo of all the work.
When you’re done taking up that linoleum floor and need to remodeling debris disposal, just phone 800-433-1094 or visit AAA Rousse Services. We can help with that and so much more, so give us a ring today.

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